The start of 2021 saw the end of the Brexit transition period after a decisive win in December 2019 for Boris Johnson’s Conservative Party on a promise to ‘Get Brexit Done.’ But does Brexit mean the end of discussions about the UK’s relationship with Europe?

Research by Redfield & Wilton Strategies has found that 57% would be more likely to vote for a Party that does not campaign for re-joining the European Unionthan one that does. A significant 43% would be more likely to vote for a Party that campaigns for re-joining the European Union.

Respondents under 45 are divided on whether they would be more likely to vote for a Party that campaigns to re-join the European Union or not. Half (51%) of 18-to-24-year-olds would be more likely to vote for a Party that campaigns to re-join the European Union, which may, in part, owe to the fact that many would not have been able to vote in the 2016 Brexit Referendum. Older age groups are less likely to say they would favour a Party that campaigns to re-join the European Union—more than two-thirds of respondents 65 and above (69%) would be more likely to vote for a Party that does not campaign to re-join the European Union.

Despite the key Conservative promise to ‘Get Brexit Done,’ a fifth (19%) of 2019 Conservative voters would be more likely to vote for a party that campaigns to re-join the European Union. The majority of 2019 Labour voters (60%) and 2019 Liberal Democrat voters (63%) would be more likely to support a Party that campaigns to re-join the European Union. Given that the Liberal Democrats pledged to ‘stop Brexit’ in December 2019, it is notable that 37% Liberal Democrat voters would be more likely to vote for a Party that does not campaign to re-join the European Union­­––suggesting a desire among some voters for their Party to prioritise other issues.

Regardless of attitudes towards membership of the European Union, approximately two-thirds (65%) of respondents would be more likely to vote for a Party that suggests warmer relations with the European Union.

A majority in all age groups says they would be more likely to vote for a Party that suggests warmer relations with the European Union, suggesting that regardless of Brexit vote, many would like the United Kingdom to remain close allies with the EU.

To be sure, there are significant differences by political party: half (49%) of 2019 Conservative voters would be more likely to vote for a Party that suggests cooler relations with the European Union, compared to just 28% of 2019 Labour voters.

While Brexit has now officially been implemented, Britons remain divided on whether the UK should be a member of the European Union. 2019 Labour and Liberal Democrat voters would be more likely to vote for a Party that campaigns to re-join the European Union, along with a significant minority of 2019 Conservative voters. Beyond EU membership, the majority of Britons—regardless of age group—would be more likely to vote for a Party that suggests warmer relations with the European Union, though half of 2019 Conservative voters would favour a Party that seeks cooler relations.

To find out more information about this research contact our research team. Redfield & Wilton Strategies is a member of the British Polling Council and abides by its rules.

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