The latest poll conducted by Redfield & Wilton Strategies finds 55% of British respondents saying they would support the UK switching to a four-day working week, while only 15% are in opposition. A quarter (24%) of respondents neither support nor oppose the switch to four working days a week.

The Labour Party called for a 32-hour working week during the 2019 Election, which the Party said it would introduce over a ten-year period. Corresponding with this history of support for the policy, a greater proportion of 2019 Labour voters (62%) than 2019 Conservative voters (49%) said they would support a four-day working week in the UK. Still, support for the switch to four working days a week has considerable support among voters of both parties, with only 19% of Conservative voters saying they would oppose the policy. 

A significant proportion of younger respondents are in favour of the switch: 66% of 18-to-24-year-olds, 70% of 25-to-34-year-olds, and 67% of 35-to-44-year-olds support the UK switching to a four-day working week. Support then decreases to 51% of 45-to-54-year-olds, 49% of 55-to-64-year-olds, and 43% of 65-and-overs, though again, a plurality of each group said they would support a four-day work week.

Opposition is highest from respondents aged 65 and over at 25%, despite much of this age group being retired. Indeed, 25% of respondents who said they are retired oppose the introduction of a four-day working week, compared to 12% of those who said they are employed and working.  

Overall, there is substantial support and little opposition to implementing a four-day working week in the UK, showing it to be a particularly popular proposed policy of the Labour Party.

To find out more information about this research contact our research team. Redfield & Wilton Strategies is a member of the British Polling Council and abides by its rules.

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